Hip Pain


 

HIP ARTHRITIS

What is Hip Arthritis?

The hip is a ball and socket joint connecting the pelvis and the thigh. The joint is lined with articular cartilage. Articular cartilage is the smooth, white tissue lining the ends of each bone, and can break down over time from injury or the natural aging process. This process is known as degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis.

How do you know if you have Hip Arthritis?

Symptoms can include hip pain, inflammation and stiffness. X-ray often are needed to confirm the diagnosis.

What are the treatments for Hip Arthritis?

The goal of treatment is to control the pain and often includes medication, bracing, therapy, and a cortisone injection. Nonsurgical options historically included rest, modified activities, weight loss, medication, and physical therapy. The definitive treatment for hip arthritis is a joint replacement (total hip replacement). Many patients are not ready for a joint replacement and there are a number of strategies to help manage pain until the patient is ready or the disease is severe enough to warrant surgery.

Dr. Gifford now offers alternatives to hip replacement including platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections and stem cell injections. Learn about the alternatives to a total hip replacement here.

Trochanteric Bursitis

(Hip Bursitis, Gluteal Tendinopathy, Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome)

What is Trochanteric bursitis?

The hip joint is a ball (femur bone) and socket joint, and the outside of the femur bone is known as the greater trochanter. Hip or trochanteric bursitis is now known a greater trochanteric pain syndrome.

Research shows that trochanteric pain syndrome is mostly caused by minor tears or damage to the muscle and tendons over the outside of the hip, and not hip bursitis. Most tendon injuries are a result of gradual wear and tear. Stress can result in micro tears over time, and the damage can exceed the rate of repair. Micro-damage over time can result in degenerative tears of the tendon and pain.

How do you know if you have greater trochanteric pain syndrome?

Symptoms can include hip pain or pain extending over the outside of the thigh. The pain can become worse when lying on one’s side, getting up from a chair or walking up or down stairs. The side of the hip can be very tender when pressed on. Imaging, including a MRI or musculoskeletal ultrasound, may be prescribed to confirm the diagnosis.

What are the treatments greater trochanteric pain syndrome?

Nonsurgical options historically included rest, ice, medication, and physical therapy.

Dr. Gifford now offers alternatives to surgery for chronic tendinopathy including platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections, stem cell injections and percutaneous needle tenotomy (Tenex). Learn more about the alternatives to surgery here.

Iliopsoas Bursitis

(Snapping Hip Syndrome)

What is Iliopsoas Bursitis?

The iliopsaos tendon crosses the hip joint and is a hip flexor, helping bend the knee and hip toward the chest. The tendon can be injured from an acute injury or from overuse. Most tendon injuries are a result of gradual wear and tear. Micro-damage over time can result in degenerative tears of the tendon and pain.

The iliopsoas bursa can also be inflamed with repetitive trauma. The bursa is a liquid filled sack that sits between the muscle/tendon and the bone, and when inflamed can cause pain in the hip or groin.

How do you know if you have Iliopsoas bursitis?

Symptoms can include pain in the front of the hip or deep in the groin. The pain is increased when flexing the hip. Imaging or musculoskeletal ultrasound, will often confirm the diagnosis.

What are the treatments Iliopsoas bursitis?

Nonsurgical options historically included rest, ice, medication, and physical therapy.

Dr. Gifford now offers alternatives to surgery for chronic tendinopathy including platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections, stem cell injections and percutaneous needle tenotomy (Tenex). Learn more about alternatives to surgery here.

Location

417 Sports Medicine & Orthopedics
3328 South National Avenue
Springfield, MO 65807
Phone: 417-261-5669
Fax: 417-771-3256

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417-261-5669