Shoulder Pain


 

ROTATOR CUFF TEAR

What is a Rotator Cuff Tear?

The rotator cuff is a collection of muscles and tendons that work with the joint to keep the shoulder joint in position. Rotator cuff injuries are common and can occur during sports, from a fall, from repetitive overhead motion, or from degeneration of the tendon. Tears occur when the tendon fibers are damaged. The tear can involve the whole tendon (complete tear) or only some of the fibers (partial tear).

How do you know if you have a Rotator Cuff Tear?

Patients typically experience pain over the outside of the shoulder or arm. To confirm the diagnosis of a rotator cuff injury you may require x-rays, or an ultrasound.

What are rotator cuff treatments?

In many cases, rotator cuff injuries will heal without surgery. In some cases, rotator cuff tears do not heel. In the past, when traditional non-operative treatments failed, surgery was the only option recommended to patients. Dr. Gifford now offers alternatives to shoulder surgery for partial rotator cuff tears, including platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections and stem cell injections.

PRP and stem cell injections for Rotator Cuff Tears use a patient’s own platelets or stem cells to help accelerate healing and promote tissue regeneration. Learn more about PRP here.

CALCIFIC ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY (TENDONITIS)

What is Calcific Rotator Cuff Disease?

Calcific tendinitis is due to hydroxyapatite (crystalline calcium phosphate) in the rotator cuff, causing pain and inflammation. No one knows what causes the calcifications to form, but calcifications are found in 5% of asymptomatic healthy adults.

How do you know if you have Calcific Rotator Cuff Disease?

While the calcium deposit is forming, you may only feel a mild to moderate pain, or no pain at all. The calcification can result in severe pain and cause you to lose motion in your shoulder, resulting in frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis). Pain can be severe and lifting your arm may be painful. An X-ray will usually confirm the presence of calcium deposits.

What is the treatment for Calcific Rotator Cuff Disease?

The goal of treatment is to control pain and common treatments including medication, therapy and cortisone injections are prescribed. In the past, when traditional non-operative treatments failed, surgery was the only option recommended to patients. Dr. Gifford now offers minimally invasive alternatives to surgery.

Percutaneous ultrasonic needle tenotomy (Tenex) can help remove the calcium despite inserting a needle into the calcium deposit and rinsing the calcium away with sterile saline. Learn more about Tenex here.

SHOULDER ARTHRITIS

What is Shoulder Arthritis?

Approximately 20% of the adult population is affected by shoulder arthritis. Shoulder arthritis is caused by wear and tear of the articular cartilage, the white tissue lining the ends of the bone. This is known as degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis.

Two joints within the shoulder can be affected by arthritis:

  • The acromioclavicular (AC) joint, located where the clavicle (collarbone) meets the acromion (roof of the shoulder joint).
  • The glenohumeral joint, located where the ball of the humerus (arm bone) meets the glenoid (socket).

How do you know if you have Shoulder Arthritis?

Shoulder arthritis can cause symptoms of joint pain, stiffness and weakness. During the clinical examination, Dr. Gifford localizes the source of pain using a number of tests such as an x-ray or ultrasound to confirm the diagnosis.

What are the treatments for Shoulder Arthritis?

The goal of treatment is to control the pain using medication and a cortisone injection. In the past when traditional non-operative treatments failed, surgery was the only option recommended to patients. Dr. Gifford now offers minimally invasive alternatives to surgery.

PRP and stem cell injections for shoulder arthritis use a patient’s own platelets or stem cells to help accelerate healing and promote tissue regeneration. Learn more about PRP here.

Location
417 Sports Medicine & Orthopedics
3330 South National Avenue
Springfield, MO 65807
Phone: 417-261-5669
Fax: 417-771-3256
Office Hours

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417-261-5669